Real Life Girls (The World God Only Knows Review)

The World God Only Knows Cover Image

 

I don’t think it’s possible to summarize the premise of TWGOK without making it sound like your garden variety otaku-wish-fulfillment-sleazefest harem comedy, but let’s try regardless. Keima Katsuragi, the titular God who’s better at dating sim than Michael Jordan at basketball or me at procrastination, has his life turned upside down when a ditzy demon girl from another world enlisted his help to solve the problem of evil spirit escapee hiding themselves in human girls’ body.  Apparently you can whisk away the spirit by winning the vessel girl’s heart and kiss her, and Typical Animango Misunderstanding happened as the girl mistaken Keima’s godlike capacity in 2D realm as proof of being real life Casanova. Keima decided to treat this situation like one of his games,  he eventually found that somehow the evil spirits really really like the girls in his school, he set out to kiss these girls one at a time to save them… okay, better stop here. How convenient, pandering, and tiresome, right?

Except it’s really not. Instead, it’s a sharply written, subversive, piece of work that  consistently amused, engaged  and surprised me throughout its run. It works.
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You Can’t Handle the Truth (‘Stealth Symphony’ Review)

Stealth Symphony Key Image

Dragon. Zombie. Vampire. Ninja. Lizard men. Robot wolf. A lot of mythical creatures wreaking havoc in urban fantasy environment. A big ensemble cast, at least a third of them is probably unnecessary. Psychopath made to look endearing. Yep, this is a Ryohgo Narita joint, alright. Continue reading

In the Mood for Love

Kimini ni Todoke Ore Monogatari Montage

Happy (belated) Valentine’s Day!

Work had absolutely been slaying me for the first two weeks of this month, but reprieve has finally arrived (for now). As I have a lot of sentimental fondness for the middle part of February for reasons beyond just the chocolate-related one, it feels like a great time to discuss two of the sweetest, mushiest, romantic series I’ve ever had the pleasure to discover.

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Nostalgia for A Smile (‘Memories’ Review)

Memories poster image.png

So, I participated in the anime secret santa event organized by the fellows at Reverse Thieves, and got three very well-regarded and technically accomplished anime films as recommendations: Memories, Lupin: Castle of Cagliostro, and Redline. While I’d plan to watch all three at some point, the eventual choice for a review is an easy decision. I love humane drama with sci-fi elements, and Memories is one I had been meaning to see for a while, so the rec has essentially become the final push for me.

Unsurprisingly, I came away from it feeling pretty darn satisfied and impressed.

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I Know You Know I Know What You’re Gonna Do (Spiral: The Bonds of Reasoning Review)

Spiral Bonds of Reasoning

Spiral: Suiri no Kizuna/The Bonds of Reasoning started out like a typical juvenile murder mystery, but soon shifted direction to a psychological suspense pitting a bunch of deadly teenagers trying their darnedest to outsmart each other. Sort of like Death Note, except more repetitive and somehow even less believable despite the lack of magical killer notebook.

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Elementary, My Dear Puppet (Ayatsuri Sakon Review)

Ayatsuri Sakon Poster

Seeing the resurgence of mystery/detective shows lately, I figured it’d be a good time to dredge up an old favorite from the last turn of century. Karakurizoushi Ayatsuri Sakon, or Puppet Master Sakon, has a very clear identity as classic murder mystery show, in the sense that anyone who can’t stand repetitive cycle of gory corpses, people being spiteful to each other, and tons of scenes with investigators standing around discussing the likes of alibi, motive, and opportunity, shouldn’t come anywhere close to it. On the other hand, those who can’t get enough of that stuff should be able to really enjoy its pure whoddunit set-up that enabled the audience to sleuth along, distinct atmosphere and setting, and a great protagonist in crime-solving ventriloquist Tachibana Sakon.

Bonus points if you like puppets, especially the creepy murderous variant.
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